I-SPY 2 is a clinical trial for women with newly diagnosed locally advanced breast cancer


Today most women with breast cancer receive standard chemotherapy.  We know that some breast cancers respond well to standard chemotherapy but some do not.  The I-SPY 2 TRIAL (Investigation of Serial Studies to Predict Your Therapeutic Response with Imaging And moLecular Analysis 2) is a clinical trial for women with newly diagnosed locally advanced breast cancer to test whether adding investigational drugs to standard chemotherapy is better than standard chemotherapy alone before having surgery.  The treatment phase of this trial will be testing multiple investigational drugs that are thought to target the biology of each participant’s tumor.  The trial will use the information from each participant who completes the study treatment to help decide treatment for future women who join the trial.  This will help the study researchers learn more quickly which investigational drugs will be most beneficial for women with certain tumor characteristics.  The I-SPY 2 TRIAL will test the idea of tailoring treatment by using molecular tests to help identify which patients should be treated with investigational drugs.  Results of this trial may help make investigational drugs available to more women in the future.

Learn more about I-SPY 2

To learn more about participating in the I-SPY 2 TRIAL, visit Participation in I-SPY 2

To learn more about the procedures used in the I-SPY 2 TRIAL, visit I-SPY 2 Procedures

To find out if this trial is open at a clinic near you, visit I-SPY 2 TRIAL Sites

Who Should Participate?

Before making a decision to participate in the I-SPY 2 TRIAL, visit Things to Consider Before Joining the I-SPY 2 TRIAL

 For a general over view of the I-SPY 2 TRIAL, view the I-SPY 2 Patient Brochure

 

I-SPY 2 TRIAL Video

I-SPY 2 is sponsored by the Biomarkers Consortium, a unique partnership led by the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH), which includes the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and a large number of partners from major pharmaceutical companies, leading academic medical centers, and non-profit and patient advocacy groups. Funding for I-SPY 2 comes mostly from non-profit foundations, including The Safeway Foundation, and other philanthropic donors.